Category Archives: History

We have a very large library of books, pamphlets, catalogs and other research materials to put together a history of most manufacturers of antique and modern clocks. If you have a question about a clock, please send several close-up, clear pictures of the clock, the glass, the dial (face), and any labels or papers in the clock. We will do our best to give you a little history of the origin of your clock.


Sessions Kitchen Clock – Before and After


Several months ago, a customer asked if I could restore a clock he found in his Father’s farm house in central Illinois. He remembered the clock from his childhood. The case was in very bad shape. The wood was dry and the finish was cracked. The clock probably sat on a shelf in the kitchen, next to a wood or coal burning cook stove for years. The glass in the door was gone and the pendulum had been cut down both sides. This would have raised the center of gravity of the pendulum allowing the clock to run faster.


AfterThe case was so dried out that it actually fell apart. The old finish was stripped off and some warping of the wood top was taken out. The case was finished, glued back together, new glass, dial, and a new pendulum was installed. The movement was overhauled and tested. Shown below are the before and after pictures of the clock.

Greg Davis – Owner

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Fantastic Find

My father (Boyd Davis) collected clocks all his life, a passion that I seem to have inherited. In 1971, my father and mother opened a clock retail store in Columbus , Ohio (The House of Clocks on Lane Ave). Since I was a junior in high school when the store opened, I’ve never been sure if the store was part of his love for clocks or set up as a second income for the family, or both.

My father had a retired jeweler that did trade work for him. In November 1974, the retired jeweler brought in a box full of clock case and movement parts he had been storing in his attic. He gave it to my father saying “I don’t know exactly what this is, but I’m sure it’s American. I’m sure it’s something special and I want you to have it”. My father offered to buy the box for $50, which was quickly refused. Since the store was busy, the box was placed on a shelf in the back room.

Just before Christmas, my father cleared a table in the back room, took the box down and proceeded to examined it, placing the pieces of the box into position on the table. The clock was totally apart, since all the glue joins had come apart, but it was all there. Much to my father’s surprise, he slowly laid out a complete J. C. Brown Acorn clock (case, movement, fusee mechanism and tablet). The clock was totally restored by father over the next several months.

My father, being one of the most honest men I ever knew, gave the gentleman 3 new Colonial grandfather clocks of his choosing, as payment for the clock. One for each of his grown daughters for Christmas; however, he refused the fourth clock that my father offered to place in his home.


The clock held a very prominent and prestigious place in my mother and father’s home for several years. It was the star of his collection. My father and mother divorced in 1980 after 27 years of marriage. The clock collection was sold, along with other possessions, to settle the divorce. I often wonder who is now showing off this magnificent sample of American clock making history in their collection. I can only hope it is admired as much as my father admired it.

Greg Davis

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1807 – Affordiable clocks for the masses

In  Eli Terry entered into a contract with 2 other men to manufacture 4000 clock movements with dials, hands, weights, and pendulums in a 4 year period. This in clock circles is known as the Porter Contract. In 1806 Terry bought a sawmill that used water power in Plymouth CT. He then hired laborers with specific abilities to produce the various pieces of the clocks, to an accuracy that made the parts interchangeable. One of the first in America to accomplish interchangeable mass produced parts for a product. The fact that the parts were made and assembled by skilled craftsmen, kept the cost down and allowed a much greater production volume, way more than 1 clockmaker could accomplish by himself. Thus was started, in this country, a new business of mass producing clocks, which brought the cost of a clock down to where the masses could afford them. Clocks were no longer for just the aristocrats. Apprenticing with Eli Terry at this time was Seth Thomas and Silas. Hoadley, who both went on to be noted American clockmakers. In my career of over 40 years, I have had the pleasure of restoring several of the now 210 year old all wood movements.

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